Nathan Zipfel

Nathan Zipfel

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Brides in Fife

Brides in Fife

I gathered the material below from existing queries. New submissions are welcome, as well as corrections or new information for listings below.

 

Helen ADAMS, born about 1804 in Fife, married James HILSON, born about 1803 in Fife, on 28 Nov 1834 at Largo, Fife. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Christina ANDERSON married Ebenezer TRAILL May 23, 1856 in AuchtermuchyEbenezer born abt 1827 Auchtermuchy, Fife (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Allison ADDISON married Robert REDPATH reg Dunfermline on 31 Dec 1868. Allison was born about 1845.. (submiited by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect)
Catherine ANGUS (poss born in Abdie 1834) married Donald McLACHLAN (born 26th Oct 1829) at parish church Inverkeithing January 1854 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Agnes Dewar ADAMSON married James Morgan SIMPSON, on 06 Sept. 1893 in Wemyss, county Fife. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Agnes ANDERSON married David GOODSIRE 5th February 1775, Kirkcaldy (PR) (Submitter: /This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">Patricia Legg)
Annie ANDERSON married Andrew LESLIE, s/o George Leslie and Catherine Young, 21 Feb 1873 at Dysart, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Isabella Dalgleish ARNOTT married Henry DOLAN, 1 Jun 1888 Crossgates Fife. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margaret Downie BURT married Gilbert Wilson MASON in 1899 in Dunfermline Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Johanna CAMERON married James ADAMSON around 1875 in Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Ann CARSTAIRS married Philip RUSSELL in 1808 at Kinghorn, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet COUPER and David WILSON b.abt.1782 were married abt. 1811 in FifeJanet Couper b. abt 1789 to James Couper and Janet Ritchie (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margaret COUSTON married James LESSELS on February 13th 1841 in Dunfermline (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Isabella CREE married to David THOMSON, age 34, on Jan 1, 1867 in St. Margaret's Church of Dunfermline. David claimed James Thomson and Isabella Syme as his parents. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jane McDonald DONALDSON married William SNOWDOWNE on 26 March 1920 at Dunfermline. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet HAMILTON married Thomas PHILP on 13 Nov 1803, marriage recorded in Dunfermline District (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George DUNN and Ann HENDERSON were married 29 Nov 1799 in Ceres, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margaret GIBB, daughter of John Gibb or David Gib (which??) married Henry BAXTER in 1825 in Inverkeithing (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet GOODSIR m. George HENDERSON 9th February 1797, Abbotshall (PR) (Submitter: /This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">Patricia Legg)
Agnes GREIG married William BURT 9/16/1837 in Dunfermline (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Christian HENDERSON married David ROBB b. 1807, Kinross, in 1832 Abbotshall, Fife. (Submitter: /This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">Patricia Legg)
Elisabeth HENDERSON married Robert TAYLOR on 6 November 1825 in Auchtermuchty, Fife County (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Katherin HORN, daughter of Andrew Horn and Agnes Philip, married Matthew CONDIE, son of George Condie and Margaret Henderson, about 1785 Drysart, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Ann HUGHES married David IZETT in 1861 in Cleland, Shotts, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet LAW married William MOIR , 27 Mar 1826 in Dunfermline, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Elisabeth LISTER married George BIRRELL Feb. 19, 1850 at Milton of Balgonie, Markinch, Fifeshire (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jane LOWSON married Thomas FREEBAIRN, or FAIRBAIRN either spelling, 14 July, 1804 in Kilrenny, Fife, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Lydia Smith MALCOLM married Henry DOLAN 2 Apr 1920 Townhill Dunfermline (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Agnes MCKENZIE married Walter DOLAN in 1890 Dunfermline (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jean MACKIE md James BRODIE or BRYDIE 17 Nov. 1844 in Carnbee, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Helen MANEY married John SIMPSON, born 1849, 22 Jun 1876 in Tayport (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Elspeth MASON, daughter of Andrew Mason and Jean Baxter, married George TOD in 1791 in Cameron, FIF (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Isabella McDONALD and Robert DONALDSON married in 1884 in Dunfermline, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Agnes MELDRUM married John ADAMSON in May 1837 in Scoonie, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jane MILLAR married Robert ADAMSON on 23 Apr 1847 at Auchterderran, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jane or Jean MILLER married John Miller REID on 21 Nov 1829 in Dunfermline (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
Jannett MOYES married John ANDERSON 14th Aug. 1750, Kinghorn (OPRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Jenat OLIPHANT married Thomas BELL in early 1670 or before, near St Andrews, Co. of Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Mary PORTEOUS, born about 1770, possibly in Dalgetty, Fife married Henry GIBB in 1798 in Inverkeithing, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margaret RAMSAY married Alexander BEALL, son of William Beall, on 5/21/1646 in the parish church, St. Andrew'sFifeshire, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jane RATTRAY married James JACK in 1838 in Cupar, Fife, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet RITCHIE and James COUPER were married 31 May 1776 in Fife. (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Elizabeth ROBERTSON married Archibald McLACHLAN in 1828, Carnock (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Christina Bell ROGERS married John Arthur JAMIESON on 4th Sept. 1849 in Newburgh, Fife, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Isabella- ROLLO (I think) married David WYLIE in 1838 in FIFE, Scotland. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Amelia RUSSELL married Alexander MORRISON (my gg grandfather) of Clackmannan at Saline, Fife in 1835 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Elizabeth SHARP m. Stephen PARMENTER in Cupar, Fife, 1849 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jean STEVENSON married James CAIRNS in Kinross, Kinross on 8 Dec. 1839 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Christian TRAILL married on 12/5/1639 to William BEALL in the parish church, St. Andrew's, Fife, Scotland (from Jackson H. Day's Beall Database)
Mary WEIR m. Robert McBAIN, 1846 in Dunfermline (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Agnes WILLIAMSON married Andrew BURT on 30 June, 1787 Torryburn, FifeshireAndrew Burt, son of Peter Burt and Margaret Russell, was born 31 October, 1764 Kaistock, Dunfermline, FifeAgnes Williamson, daughter of William Williamson and Mary Knox, was born 25 February, 1765 Dunfermline. (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

UNKNOWN BRIDES

Margaret ? married John BURT, Sr., on 10 December 1836, Torryburn, Fife. John Burt, Sr. was born 2 August, 1816, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland; he died on 18 April, 1888 in Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A.. Margaret ? was born on 30 May, 1814 Baldridge, Dunfermline; she died 0n 09 August, 1874 Salt Lake City, Utah. (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

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Births and Christenings in Fife

Births and Christenings in Fife

A way to make contacts and share information. Submissions welcome. Please me send your birth information and I will add it with a hyperlink to your email. Include sources when possible.

 

Helen ADAMS, born about 1804 in Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Georgina ADAMSON, born around 1848 in Fife, daughter of Robert Adamson and Jane Millar. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James ADAMSON, born 21st August 1896, probably Weymss, Fife, Scotland, son of Robert Adamson and his first wife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Peter ADAMSON, born 9 Jan 1849 in Fife, possibly Ballbeggie, son of ? and Sophia ? (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Robert ADAMSON, born early 1870's, Weymss Fife Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Annie ANDERSON was born abt 1854 at Dysart, Fife, daughter of Smith Christie Anderson and Margaret Inglis (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jean ANDERSON was born in Kilrenny, Fife about 1714 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Andrew BAXTER, born Fife 1810-14 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Alexander BEALL, born 1621-2, St. AndrewsFife, Scotland, son of William Beall (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Alexander BEALL, born 8/22/1649 bapized 10/11/1649, Fife, Scotland, son of Alexander Beall and Margaret Ramsey (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Andrew BEALL, baptized 3/18/1655, St. Andrew's Church, Fife, Scotland, son of Alexander Beall and Margaret Ramsey (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James BEALL, born 2/5/1652, baptized 2/5/1652., Fife, Scotland, son of Alexander Beall and Margaret Ramsey (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Ninian BEALL, born 1625 at or near Largo, Ligensheim Fyffe (Fifeshire) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
William BEALL, baptized 8/2/1647, in St. Andrew's, Fife, Scotland, son of Alexander Beall and Margaret Ramsey (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Robert BELL, was born in 1670 near St Andrews, Co. of Fife, son of Thomas Bell and Jenat Oliphant (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Robert BROWN born of Kilrenny, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Andrew BURT, son of Peter Burt and Margaret Russell, was born 31 October, 1764 Kaistock, Dunfermline, Fife (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect byThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John BURT, Sr., was born 12 August, 1816, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James CAIRNS was born in Ballingry Fife in 1894, son of Robert CAIRNS and Christina LITSTER (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James CAIRNS, born Dunfermline, Fife around 1819 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Anna CARMICHEAL, born about 1690, near Largo, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
William CASH, born 1653 Fife, Strathmiglo, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Peter CESAR, Christened 9/29,1751 in Dysart, Fife, son of Cathrin Beal and Peter Cesar (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Alexander COUTTS, born abt 1830 Cupar Fife Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Elizabeth CULLEN, born 1904 in Inverkeithing, Fife Co, Scotland, daughter of Robert Cullen and Alice Maude Lark (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David DEAS, born Sept 19, 1830, Pathhead, son of John Deas and Margaret Ogg. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James DEAS, born ca 1819, Pathhead, Fife, son of John Deas and Margaret Ogg. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
William DEAS, born Oct 5, 1833, Dysart, son of John Deas and Margaret Ogg. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John DEAS, born ca1795. Pathhead, Fife, son of James Deas and Christian Morres or Morris (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John DEAS, b 12th Oct. 1846, Dysart, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Mitchell Robertson DEWAR, born Feb. 16,1877 in Dunshalt, FifeScotland, son of David Dewar and Jane Hay (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jean DONALDSON, born 1834, Dumfermline, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet DUNCAN was born 3 Jan 1762 Abbotshall in Fife, daughter of Thomas Duncan (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David DUNCAN was born 26 Sep 1762 Abbotshall in Fife, son of Thomas Duncan (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Thomas DUNCAN was born in August, 1737, Abbotshall in Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Rachel DUNN, daughter of George DUNN and Ann HENDERSON, was christened 13 May 1810 in Strathmiglo, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George DUTCH, born Ferry-Port on Craig, Fife, 1828 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
William DUTCH, christened 17 November 1728, Balmerino, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Alexander ERSKINE, born 27 May 1842 Dunfermline, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margaret FINDLAY, born 1808 Dumfermline, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Sophie FREEBAIRN, or FAIRBAIRN born 4 Dec.1811 Kilrenny, Fife, daughter of Thomas Freebairn and Jane Lowson. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David GOODSIRE, son of David Goodsire & Agnes Anderson, born 10th Dec. 1775, Kirkcaldy (from PRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George GOODSIRE, son of David Goodsire & Agnes Anderson, born 18th February 1798, Kirkcaldy (from PRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet GOODSIRE, daughter of David Goodsire & Agnes Anderson, born 18th October, 1777, Kirkcaldy (from PRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John GOODSIRE, son of David Goodsire & Agnes Anderson, born 9th June 1779, Kirkcaldy (from PRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Agness HENDERSON, daughter of George Henderson and Janet Goodsir, born 18th Nov. 1798, Abbotshall (from PRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Ann HENDERSON may have been born 5 Sept 1778, Aberdour, Fife, the daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Henderson. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Christian HENDERSON, daughter of George Henderson and Janet Goodsir, born 14th Oct. 1808, Abbotshall (from PRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David HENDERSON, son of George Henderson and Janet Goodsir, born 10th Sept. 1805, Abbotshall (from PRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David HENDERSON, born 1848 Markinch, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George HENDERSON, son of George Henderson and Janet Goodsir, born18th Dec. 1811, Abbotshall (from PRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margaret Gardiner HENDERSON, born 1850 Markinch, Fife. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Susanna HENDERSON, daughter of George Henderson and Janet Goodsir, born. 25th Dec. 1801, Abbotshall (from PRs) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Mary HENNING, born in Cupar, Fifeshire, around 1844. Her parents were Thomas Henning and Margaret Miller. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James HILSON, born about 1803 in Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James HILSON, son of James Hilson and Helen Adams, was born about 1847 at Scoonie, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Alexander HYND, born 12 May 1835 Kirkcaldy, Fife County, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Andrew HYND born at New Row Dunfermline Fife in 1851 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Henry GIBB, born1827 in Dunfermline, Fife, son of William Gibb and Anne Her(r)on (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James GIBB, born 1838 in Dunfermline, Fife, son of William Gibb and his second wife Johan Love (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margaret GIBB, born 1840 in Dunfermline, Fife, daughter of William Gibb and his second wife Johan Love (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
William GIBB, born about 1806, probably in Inverkeithing, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Elisabeth HENDERSON was born circa 1804 in Fife County, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
William HILLOCK, was born in Fife, Scotland in 1744-45 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Elizabeth HONEYMAN, born circa 20 Dec 1834 AuchtermuchtyFife, daughter of John Honeyman and Janet Rankin (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Andrew HYND born at New Row Dunfermline Fife in 1851 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John IZETT, born 30 Apr. 1780, Torryburn, Fifeshire (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet Greig JACK, born 1839 in Scoonie, Fife, Scotland, daughter of James Jack and Jane Rattray (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Hellen KIRK, born about 1858 some where near Cupar, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James Myles LAING, born 14 Sep 1871 in Auchtermuchty, Fife County, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Eleanor or Helen LOCKHART was born on Sept. 22, 1822 in Kircaldy, Fife. Her parents believed to be George Lochart and Margaret Ure (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Hugh LOW, born Auchterderran around 1852, son of Peter Low and Isabella Jamison (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margaret LOW, born Dalgety around 1854, daughter of Peter Low and Isabella Jamison (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jane LOWSON, was born 17 April 1774 in Kilrenny, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James LUNDY, Sr., according to LDS record, christened Jan. 22, 1674 in Kemback, FifeScotland, son of James Lundie. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Amy Boon MARSHALL, born March 4 1903, in the Parish of Forgan, Newport on Tay, County of Fife, Scotland, daughter of David Marshall and Rose Kathleen Wicks or Wix. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Elspeth MASON was born.1764 Cameron, Fife, daughter of Andrew Mason and Jean Baxter. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Elizabeth McBAIN, born 10/12/1851 in Dunfermline, daughter of Robert McBain and Mary Weir (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Robert McBAIN, born1828 in Dunfermline, Fife County, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Rev. John William MCLINTOCK, born July 26th 1832 in Kirkcaldy, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Colin Campbell MITCHELL, born 20 May 1769 in Kingsbarns, Fife, Scotland, son of Alexander MITCHELL and Elspet Anderson (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Thomas MOIR, born 1810, Dumfermline, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Helen MONCRIEFF, christening record dated Oct 21,1821 at St. Andrews & St. Leonards Parents: William & Agnes Charters. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Thomas MORRISON born 1814 in Cults, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Samuel NELSON was born in 1882 in Tayport, Fife, then called Ferry-Port-on-Craig. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Andrew NESS born 1820 in Wesmyss to Walter Ness b. 1786, Wesmyss and Jean Chalmers b. 1788, Anstruther (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect byThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Joseph NORMAND, born 1809 in Dsyart (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Isabell PATIE born 15 Feb 1817 in Tayport, daughter of William PATIE (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John PAXTON was born 21 Sep 1868 in Kinglassie, Fife., son of William Paxton and Helen Murie (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Criston PEEPLES, Christen: 1634 St. Andrews, Fife, daughter of Captain David Peebles and Elspet Mackie (Submitters: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
William PEEPLES, Christen: 7 Jul 1635 Kilconquhar, FifeScotland, son of Captain David Peebles and Elspet Mackie (Submitters: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Alison PEEPLES, Christen: 7 Jul 1641 Balclavie, Scotland, daughter of Captain David Peebles and Elspet Mackie (Submitters: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John PEEPLES, birth: 9 Apr 1644 Balclavie, Scotland, son of Captain David Peebles and Elspet Mackie (Submitters: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margret PEEPLES, Christen: 18 Sep 1642 St. Monance, Scotland, daughter of Captain David Peebles and Elspet Mackie (Submitters: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Sarah PENMAN, born in Dunfermline, Fife County 5/14/1849, possibly daughter of David Penman and Jane? (Submitters: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
William PENMAN, born in Dunfermline Jan 1758, son of William Penman and Mary Wilson. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Mary PORTEOUS, born about 1770, possibly in Dalgetty, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Jane RATTRAY, born 1815 in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John Miller REID, born 01 Jan in Inverkeithing (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David ROBB, son of David Robb & Christian Henderson, born 2nd February 1837, Kirkcaldy (PRs.) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George ROBB, son of David Robb & Christian Henderson, born 2nd June 1841, Kirkcaldy (PRs.) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James ROBB, son of David Robb & Christian Henderson, born 8th February 1839, Kirkcaldy (PRs.) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet (Jessie) ROBB, daughter of David Robb & Christian Henderson, born 22nd January 1835, Kirkcaldy (PRs.) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John ROBB, son of David Robb & Christian Henderson, born 11th July 1833, Kirkcaldy (PRs.) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Amelia Carstairs RUSSELL, born ca. June 1817 at Kinglassie, Fife. Parents were Philip Russell and Ann Carstairs (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David RYMER, born1765, Linktown, Fife, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George Edward SANFORD, born 21 Aug. 1820 Fife county Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David Edgar SMITH, born in Fife on 25 September 1876, son of John Hodge Smith, a merchant, and Isabella Mitchell Smith (nee Robertson) (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James SNEDDON born 1856 at Rumbling Bridge, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David SPENCE, born in Fifeshire, Scotland ca. 1635-1640 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
John STEVENSON, born in 1849 in Dunfermline, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Nancy TAGGART born 1834 in Dunfermline, County Fife, Scotland, daughter of Martha Smythe and ? Taggart (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John TAYLOR, born 6 October 1826 in Pleasance, Fife County, son of Robert Taylor and Elizabeth Henderson (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Robert TAYLOR was born circa 1802 in Fife County, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John Frederick THOMSON, born abt 1824, St Andrew's, Fife, son of Alexander Thomson and Ellen Saunders (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
James THOMSON, was christened in the Parish of Cupar, May 7, 1820 , son of James Thomson and Isabella Syme. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Mary THOMSON, born Fifeshire around 1866 to David Thomson and Mary Arnell (or something like it - the handwriting is difficult to read). (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Christopher TODD, born in Kingskettle in Fife County around 1825 (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Ebenezer TRAILL, born abt 1827 Auchtermuchy, Fife (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Thomas TRAIL, born Aug. 8,1823 in Kilconquhar, Fife, to Thomas Trail & Catherine Forgan. (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Thoman Squires WATSON, born 21 Sept 1844, Belingry, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George WEBSTER, who also used pen name of Linton Cuff or L.C., born March 24, 1823, at Craigrothie, in Ceres parish (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Mary WEIR, born July 13, 1820 in Dunfermline to John Weir or Wier and Henrietta ? (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George WESTWATER, born10 Dec1799 in "Pathhead, Dysart, Fifeshire" (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
CatherineWESTWATER, born 1823, believed in Dysart, son of George Westwater and Margaret Knowles (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George WESTWATER, born 1828, believed in Dysart, son of George Westwater and Margaret Knowles (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Margaret WESTWATER, born1830, believed in Dysart (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David WESTWATER, born.~1837, believed in Dysart, son of George Westwater and Margaret Knowles (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Kilias WESTWATER, born 1839, believed in Dysart, child of George Westwater and Margaret Knowles (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
AlisonWESTWATER, born 1832, believed in Dysart, daughter of George Westwater and Margaret Knowles (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Robert WILSON, born about 1690, near Largo, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Dr. Robert WILSON, born 2 April 1732 or 1736 in Cupar, Fife (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Samuel WILSON born before 1714 possibly born at St. Andrews, County Fife, Scotland. (Submitted to Fife ScotlandGenWeb GenConnect by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
William WILSON was born 03 November, 1717 in Wymyss, Fife, Scotland, son of Robert Wilson and Ann Carmichael. (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
JanetWORKMAN, born Nov. 6, 1621 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Janet WYLIE, born1864, in Auchterderran or Ballingly, Fife, daughter of John Wylie and Jean Russell (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
David WYLIE, born1866, in Auchterderran or Ballingly, Fife, son of John Wylie and Jean Russell (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
John WYLIE, born 1868, in Auchterderran or Ballingly, Fife, son of John Wylie and Jean Russell (Submitter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

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Pencaitland Parish

PENCAITLAND PARISH CHURCH


Researched and written by Norman D. H. MURPHY* and Ralph W. BARKER
Edited by Jill M. CLARK

Parish History

There has been a church at Pencaitland from the earliest times of the parochial system in Scotland, if not from its very inception. So that we may get our story into proper perspective we should have a brief look at the way in which the parish system of church organisation arose. It was left to the sons of the Saintly Queen Margaret to reconstruct the organisation of the Church, and David 1 (1124-1153) was particularly active in this work. However, it was his brother and predecessor, Alexander I (reigned 1107-1124) who put English or Norman bishops into the Celtic Cathedral of St. Andrews. Before the Scottish Reformation Pencaitland Parish was in the Diocese of St. Andrews, the Archdeaconry of Lothian and the Deanery of Haddington. During the time of David a peaceful Norman invasion of Scotland took place, and settlers from England or further afield were granted tracts of land in return for keeping law and order in the area. In due course with the establishment of episcopal dioceses, the baronial areas, in some of which new churches had been built by the barons, became natural subdivisions of the diocese, and became the parish. This division into parishes was not completed in David's reign, however, and long after his death many districts remained without a Parish Church.

The earliest complete part of the present building at Pencaitland, which we shall discuss in more detail later on, is the Winton Aisle. It dates from the l3th century; but parts of an earlier building that was known to exist at Pencaitland in the l2th century are probably incorporated in the Nave, so there has been a Church here for a very long time. As far as the history of Pencaitland Parish is known, it would appear that William the Lion (1165-1214) probably granted the lands to Everard DE PENCAITHLAND. It is certain that Everard granted the Church of his manor of Pencaithland to the monks of Kelso along with its tithes and other rights. No mention of the Church as one of the possessions of Kelso is made after 1309, however. During the War of Succession the manor was forfeited and was granted by Robert the Bruce to Robert DE LAWDER. Why he was dispossessed is not known, but Sir John MAXWELL is soon shown as the overlord, granting the advowson of the church to Dryburgh Abbey, along with an annuity from his Pencaitland lands. This was confirmed by William (LANDAL), the Bishop of St. Andrews, in 1343 and a photograph of the charter granting the advowson hangs in the Winton Aisle. Mention is also made of a chapel at Payston. The monastery collected the teinds or tithes and in return provided a vicar or vicars to minister to the people. That Pencaitland was a valuable possession of Dryburgh is obvious from the reference made to it in old records. The hill above the river and behind the manse was still until recently referred to as the Vicar's Brae. The tithes from parish churches were a valuable source of income for the monasteries, some of which collected the dues from over thirty parishes.

The story of Pencaitland Church then, is the story of the Church in Scotland as a whole. The setting up of the parochial system, and the various changes in the form of worship through the centuries are reflected in the building itself. Here we have a church building in which the various parts are of different ages, reflecting different architectural trends and religious needs, and which are still in regular use. This is quite common in Scotland.

It is interesting that Pencaitland Church was dedicated by Bishop David DE BERNHAM, who in less than ten years of his episcopate dedicated no fewer than one hundred and forty churches. Dedication of existing as well as new churches was one of the practices of the good bishop during the tour of his diocese. The consecration service would have lasted several hours, because we know the service was an elaborate one as the order of service used by David de Bernham when consecrating churches has been preserved. The date of the consecration was 1242. Whether the building referred to as "Ecclesia de Pencaitland" was the Winton Aisle or a larger church on the foundation (of which the present nave is built) is not certain.

During all the period since its foundation the history of the building itself has been uneventful. There are no bullet marks on the walls, no cannon balls are lodged in the belfry, and it must be one of the few old churches which Cromwell neglected to use as a stable for his horses.

The records pertaining to Pencaitland in particular before the Reformation are scanty, and not until the regular keeping of Session Records begins does the history of the church become a little less clouded. Of the ministers of Pencaitland, there have been many worthy men. Two deserve special mention because of their place in history. David CALDERWOOD (1641-1650) author of the monumental "History of the Kirk of Scotland" was ordered to be banished by James VI for his opposition to, among other things, the king's wish to introduce episcopacy. The Rev. James GIBSON who was presented to the vicarage of Pencaitland in 1580 by the king, was exercising the right, formerly the prerogative, of Dryburgh Abbey. Gibson was brought before the Privy Council and imprisoned on a charge of High Treason for preaching a sermon in which he accused the king of persecuting the church, though this sermon was not preached at Pencaitland.

A Description of the Pencaitland Parish Church

The building itself consists of a nave, with a gallery at the west end and with two Aisles on the north side: one, the older, called the Winton Aisle and the other the Saltoun Aisle. Whilst both these Aisles, and the tower at the West end of the church can be easily dated, the nave presents rather a different proposition. Although the furnishings are arranged in the manner of an early post-reformation church in Scotland, with the pulpit in the centre of the South wall, so far as the shape of the nave is concerned we must remember what Ian LINDSAY said: "There is no doubt that the basic plan of the small Scottish Parish Church for the next six hundred years was laid in the l3th Century." The foundations are certainly medieval, so we know an early church existed on the present site of the nave. (Some of the masonry above the level of the foundation is probably incorporated into the walls.) The Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments (1924) said that the proportioning of the lower part of the walls suggests the much altered remains of a 12th Century Church. MACGIBBON and ROSS believed it is not unlikely from the narrowing of the east end on the north side that a chancel arch may have existed. Most authorities, whilst not fully committing themselves, date the present nave as mainly l6th century. That it was early l6th Century is suggested by two facts. Firstly, after the Reformation in 1560 there was little church building in Scotland for 50 or 60 years. Secondly at the East end of the south wall of the nave there is a blocked-up doorway, which was most probably a priest's door opening into the church.

The Winton Aisle dates from the l3th Century, and is of first pointed (early English) architecture. It may have been the original church of Pencaitland, or may have served as the Sacristy to the main part of the early church. The practice in England was to suspend the reserved Eucharist above the altar in the hanging pyx. In the north and east of Scotland the pyx was placed in a richly adorned Sacrament House. It is possible that this building was used for such a purpose. At sometime after the Reformation the Winton Aisle housed a Laird's Loft. Entrance was through the East Window by way of an outside flight of steps. A water colour of the interior of the church painted in 1880 shows that the interesting West Window was almost wholly obscured, and that the loft took the form of a gallery built into the Aisle, supported in the centre by a strong wooden post. The loft itself extended to the North Wall of the building, but the part under the loft does not appear to have extended so far back. There was probably a small room there. At any rate the Kirk session minute of July 29th 1707 refers to "the giving out of the elements at the little room under the loft stair appointed for that use." Of course the present gallery may also have been referred to as the loft. The building was restored in 1882 when the memorial tablets in the Aisle were repositioned. At this time the seating on the North side of the present central aisle of the nave was at right angles to its present position, presumably facing the pulpit.

A Tour of the Present Building (Pencaitland Parish Church)

The Saltoun Aisle dates from the late l7th Century. In looking round the church let us begin at the outside of the building at the west door in the tower. In deference to the old superstition that says that it is bad luck to walk "widdershins "(counter-clockwise) round a church, we shall proceed in a clockwise direction. On the first buttress is the chain to which the jougs were attached. When the collar was lost is not known, but an illustration of the complete instrument of punishment was printed in a book published in 1898. Near the jougs there is a round-headed window and it is obvious there was once a door-way here. There was a corresponding one, now also converted to a window, on the opposite side of the church. These doorways probably pre-date the tower. It is probable that they were separate entrances for the men and women, who in some places in Scotland, as elsewhere, were segregated during worship. (The custom persisted in a few churches until the l9th century.) If these were door-ways used by the different sexes, the men's door would have been on the south of the nave and the women's on the north. It is not likely, however, that the custom existed here after the building of the tower when the new west doorway was constructed.

At this part of the church we can note the medieval foundations, which are found most of the way round the building. They disappear at the late 17th Century Saltoun Aisle, which we now reach, and which projects at right angles to the nave. The west side of the Saltoun Aisle contains a late Renaissance door-way, now blocked up. The initials over the pediment are those of Sir John SINCLAIR. Pencaitland was created a Burgh of Barony in 1695 in favour of Sir Robert Sinclair of STEVENSON. There is also an ogee-headed window, likewise built up. Note the much weathered face on the north-west corbel. This was probably a piece of an earlier building incorporated in the new work either when it was built, or at a later date. At the top of the north-east corner of the east wall of the Saltoun Aisle is the date 1864 when repairs were presumably carried out.

Adjoining the Saltoun Aisle is the Winton Aisle, a venerable structure dating from the l3th century and which was originally roofed with stone slabs. The carved faces of devils, animals, men and angels on the corbels are worthy of notice. Two large windows have been filled in, although the door-way is obviously of earlier date than the stone used for blocking the windows. This is probably l7th century work, perhaps inserted when the aisle became a Laird's Loft. It will be noticed that the original buttresses have been strengthened by later additions; the north wall of the Aisle is very much out of the perpendicular.

Proceeding to the east end of the nave, we can see that the east door has been clumsily knocked through the wall, obviously in post-reformation times. The south wall of the nave, where the early foundations again reappear, has five buttresses. Of these, the ones at each end are probably contemporary with the rest of the structure. The remaining ones were added probably as late as the 19th century, to prevent a bulging of the wall. At the east end of the south wall is a blocked-up priest's door that led into the chancel -- an indication that the nave, although of later date than the foundations, certainly pre-dates the Reformation. Features that can be observed from the south of the church are the three sundials, and the windows of the nave.

Returning to the tower we see that it bears the date 1631 and the initials of John OSWALD, the incumbent at that time. The tower houses a bell in the upper octagonal portion. The bell is dated 1656 and bears the legend "Pencaitland, fear ye the Lord." The tower at one time served as a doo-cot, and is lined with nesting boxes for the pigeons, a cause of much chagrin to the present Kirk Session, who are apt to forget the ancient law of sanctuary and wage a constant war, albeit largely a non-violent one, against the birds that still attempt to populate it. The date of the bell is a mystery in a way, because the following entry appears in the Session records, December 27th 1657 "William CAIRNES reported to the session that he and David RID . . (?) had been at Edinburgh and that the Laird of WOODHEAD and they had spoken to a merchant for a bell of 10 stone weight who promised to send to London for one." (Incidentally as the tower was built in 1631, does this mean that the church had no bell for 26 years?)

When we go inside the church again the pulpit is worth a little attention. It is a fine example of 17th century work, although the base is modern, the carving is stylised. It is not certain whether a canopy (see Gifford church, among others) was provided, but there may well have been one that was removed later. The baptismal bracket, although not an outstanding piece of workmanship is interesting, as comparatively few of these now remain. Originally the minister baptised from the pulpit, and sprinkled the water, with varying degrees of accuracy, onto the baby held below. The bracket is still in use on occasions, although now, of course, the minister descends from the pulpit during the ceremony. The old oak pew fronts, and pews at the front of the transept known as the Saltoun Aisle, are l6th or l7th century and repay examination. Some old oak is also built into the front of the gallery, which dates from 1635.

The fine stained glass window in the Winton Aisle was erected by parishioners to the memory of Mary, Lady RUTHVEN (1789-1885). The one over the east door commemorates the Rev. James COULLIE, minister of the parish from 1872-1924.

Looking again at the Winton Aisle it is considered most probable that the present single arch separating the Aisle from the former chancel was at one time arcaded. Again the change was probably made at the time of the conversion to a Laird's Loft. At least one authority considers that this change has hopelessly spoiled the Aisle. The West Window of the Winton Aisle is the original one.

There are records of burials in the church, notably under the gallery; in the Winton Aisle; and in the erstwhile chancel, where there is a memorial to the Rev. William DENUNE, minister (1685-1704) who was buried there

The Furniture

The Communion table with the matching lectern and font; and the three Communion chairs are worthy of notice. The first three were gifted to our church when St. Margaret's Church, Dumbiedykes, Edinburgh closed, and the chairs were generously donated by Mr. James MCGREGOR, in memory of the REIDS of Tyneholm.

Mason's and Other Marks

There are few of these, but the following may be seen.
On the inside of the west face of the tower:  I. K
On the north east corner of the Saltoun Aisle:  A Bench Mark
On the north west corner of the Saltoun Aisle:  DUNC JOHN
On the buttress on the east wall of the Nave:  AIRIX

The Church Yard

We have a valuable record of our local history in the headstones in the churchyard. It is most unfortunate that many years ago quite a few of the older ones were removed, but we must be grateful for those we have left. Although many are now worn and some unreadable, it is not too late to record the remaining inscriptions and this has recently been done by Mr. & Mrs. MURPHY.

On the south wall of the church there are some interesting inscriptions; one, near the old priest's door dating from 1640. Below it is a skull set into the wall. Note also the inscription in which the letter 'N' is always reversed, and the one that says "These three died of a violent fea (fever) in the year 1736." Epidemics were common in those days.

One of the most interesting features is the number of stones bearing the tools of the trade followed by the deceased. There is a spoon, and quarryman's or miner's tools among others, and the finest is near the gate leading to the manse, the burial place of a tailor.

These are only a small number of the interesting stones to be seen, but we hope you will go exploring on your own.

The Offering Houses

We are all familiar with the two small pantiled buildings, one at each entrance to the churchyard. It is interesting to know that they were erected as collecting, or offering, houses so that the elders would not have to stand outside in inclement weather. The houses were originally built in or about 1759, for there is a record in the old treasurer's books that refer to the payment, in 1760, for their building. In 1759 two stools for collecting were purchased. Are these the ones we still use today? Possibly they are, as they are very old, and there is no subsequent similar reference in the account books. If they have, indeed, lasted for 200 years the Session of the time can be considered to have made a good buy.

The problem of providing shelter, however, arose long before the offering houses were built. An entry in the Session records for 1723 states: "The Session considering the great hardships the elders are put to in collecting for the poor on the Lords Day without any covert from the weather in the winter season, they appointed a Box of Dealls to be made for a covert unto them untill they be better provided." (sic.) The East offering house, however, was rebuilt to the original design in 1911 at a cost of 312.18.6d. This was necessary because the heritors, in removing a tree, unfortunately mistook their aim and felled it on top of the building. An argument ensued about who was responsible for the rebuilding The Session or Heritors, and the Session lost the day.  Although built as offering houses there is no doubt that the buildings were also used as watch-houses against body-snatchers when occasion demanded.

Ministers at Pencaitland Parish Church

We have already said that for a long period before the Reformation the spiritual welfare of the parish was in the hands of the monks of Kelso. Until about 1309 and from 1343 to 1560 the parish was served by the monks of Dryburgh or by a substitute provided by them. There are, therefore comparatively few years in which other clergymen were in office, but the charter of 1343 refers to the parson of the time, who was Sir Gilbert DEL GLEN. (The title "Sir" would probably not imply knighthood. After the fashion of the Middle Ages it was given to a clerk in Holy Orders who was not a graduate. A graduate was called master, or doctor).

After the Reformation, there is a complete record of the incumbents. The charge was disjoined from the Presbytery of Dalkeith between 30th March 1583 and 11th October 1587. Keith MARISHALL was in the charge till 1588.

Ministers of Pencaitland since the Reformation (with dates of inductions) are as follows:

1567  Andrew BLACKHALL (Ormiston and Cranston being the charge.)
1576  John GRAY (Reader; that is not full pastor)
1580  James GIBSON
1598  Archibald OSWALD
1629  John OSWALD
1641  David CALDERWOOD
1653  Alexander VERNON (George SHIELL, M.A., Minister of Durisdeer was presented by                  Charles II, 16th Apr. and coll. 14th May 1669 his installation was canceled July, following.)
1669  Robert DOUGLAS
1674  James COCKBURN
1685  William DENUNE
1705  Matthew SIMSON
1757  George ANDERSON
1793  David PYPER
1814  Angus MAKELLAR
1843  Maxwell NICHOLSON
1855  William Lyon RIACH
1872  James COULLIE
1925  George G. MORGAN, M.A.
1964  John M. WILSON, M.A.
1970  L. David LEVISON, M.A. B.D.

You have walked round this old church and we hope you have enjoyed your visit; but let us not forget that above all it is a place for meditation and prayer. We should like you, before you leave, to spare a moment for private prayer, and to remember the minister, office-bearers and congregation who worship here, continuing the tradition of past centuries.

[Note: David Levison retired in 1982, to be succeeded by Colin DONALDSON. The charge of Pencaitland is vacant.]

* Used with permission

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The Lamp of Lothian

The Lamp of Lothian

The greatest treasure of the town of Haddington is said to be its church, St. Mary's. The earliest reference to a church in the royal burgh dates from the year AD 1139. In addition to the parish church there were monastic establishments, all of which suffered during the onslaught of Edward III's army in 1355: an event referred to as the Burnt Candlemas. (Candlemas being 2 Feb., one of the four "quarter days.")  The light of the Gospel, however, was not extinguished. Within two to three decades, the building was begun anew; its period of construction extending for half a century or more.

The title "Lamp of Lothian" referred originally to the choir of the Franciscan Friary, a few hundred yards down the river Tyne. It has since passed to the present building which has now been restored "for the solace of the whole community."

The Siege of Haddington" (1547-1549) caused great destruction to St. Mary's. Only the nave survived; the tower, transepts and choir being left roofless. Traces of cannon fire may still be seen.

At the instigation of John Knox, born in Giffordgate (just across the river), the Haddington town council had the church building repaired in 1561 "frae steeple to the west end." A barrier wall was built and the enclosed nave served as the parish church for over 400 years.

 Few improvements were made during those four centuries, notably the heightening of the galleries by some six feet in 1811. The outline of the original arches can be easily seen today. The rib vaulting of the aisles was replaced by plaster.

By 1892 further changes had taken place during the ministry of the Rev. Robert Nimmo SMITH, who dreamed of a beautiful sanctuary and restored transept. The floor was lowered and red pine blocks laid. Plaster was removed from the walls, and two new galleries, east and west, were built. A new organ was installed in the east gallery. Pulpit, baptismal font, lectern, communion table, and several stained glass windows were furnished as the result of generous donations. Only the mullions of the great east window and of the south window were restored, leaving the choir and the transepts open to the skies.

During the 1920's a concrete raft was sunk in the choir. This undoubtedly preserved the pillars from further subsidence and indirectly laid the foundations for modern day restoration.  This last and greatest restoration took place in the early 1970's. It came about as the culmination of co-operation between the Kirk Session and the newly formed Lamp of Lothian Collegiate Trust, whose intention to build a center for renewal in Haddington found early expression in the conversion of the Poldrate Mill and cottages into youth and community purpose buildings.

The restoration of the church was the largest challenge. People rose to it locally and even further afield. Miss Hilda Nimmo SMITH gave a generous benefaction. The Kirk Session sold four silver communion cups crafted during the reign of Charles I. The Duchess of Hamilton initiated an appeal for funds to restore St. Mary's and for the upkeep of the neighbouring Lamp of Lothian buildings, all for community healing and renewal through the arts and creative activity. Through her untiring efforts, the success of the appeal was assured.

 Today it stands as the largest parish church in Scotland: 197 feet long). The restored areas, completed in 1973, are roofed in fibreglass, unique in church restoration. There are many historical points of interest in the church building and church grounds. Records of early pilgrimages from St. Mary's, Haddington, to St. James of Compostela, Spain are evidenced by a large scallop shell.

A magnificent tomb belonging to the MAITLAND family is housed in the Chapel of the Three Kings. (You may find familiar family names engraved in the headstones of the kirkyard outside.) Finally, in the St. Columba Aisle you will find the following:

This is the house of prayer
May God be known to you here
This is the house of Christ's people
May you find his welcoming here

Heaven and earth are met in this place
May the sense of that lighten your burdens
Quiet your fears, encourage your faith
And then send you home to serve him well
And make his Church a praise to his name

(From St. Mary's Collegiate Church, Haddington, East Lothian)

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Obituary of A.P. WALKER of East Linton

"As regards A. P. Walker, here is his obituary which appeared in our local newspaper, The Haddingtonshire (now East Lothian) Courier on 11 January 1935"  (Relayed to Jim Walker by Garry Menziess, August 1998.)

DEATH OF A LINTONIAN

The death of Mr. A. P. WALKER, a noted Lintonian, took place suddenly at his son's residence, Longniddry, on Wednesday evening last (2 January 1935).  For the best part of his life Mr Walker occupied Bridgend House, East Linton, and was predeceased by his wife many years ago. He was a nephew of the late Bailie Alexander Walker, the well-known proprietor of the old established Red Lion Hotel.  Mr. Walker was a well-known personality in Prestonkirk district, being identified with many local organisations in his youthful days.  He was a keen Volunteer, and officiated as Bass Drummer in the old East Linton Brass Band.  For many years he served as ice-man to the East Linton Curling Club, and could relate many interesting stories of his dealings with the local players. The funeral took place to Prestonkirk Churchyard, on Friday afternoon (4 January 1935), when there was a large attendance of mourners.

 

From the HADDINGTONSHIRE COURIER, MAY 9, 1873

Death of Sergeant Sharman

Military Funeral

Sergeant Edward Richard SHARMAN, of the East Lothian Yeomanry, and late of the 14th Kings Regiment of Light Dragoons, died at his residence in the High Street, on Friday last.

Sergeant Sharman was a native of London, and at the age of nineteen years enlisted into the latter regiment in 1845.  He went with the regiment to India in 1849, and served in the Persian expedition in 1857.  He went through the whole of the campaign, carried on in central India, under Sir Hugh ROSE, and in which he was present at the capture of Dhar, and actions at Mundesore, 1857, capture of Chandarrie, battle of Behoa, siege and capture of Jhausi, action of Coouch, battle of Gollowlie, advance on and capture of Calpee and pursuit of rebels, capture of Morar Cantonments, and recapture of town and fortress of Gawalior 1858.  For his distinguished services, he was awarded a medal and a clasp.  He joined the East Lothian Yeomanry in July 1863, and continued as drill sergeant in that corps till his death.  He was much respected in the corps for his ability as a drill sergeant and for his unobtrusive character.

The funeral took place with military honours on Wednesday, and was attended by a number of the Yeomanry under command of Sergeant-Major BRAND, and a portion of the Haddington, &c., Militia, at present assembled, under command of Adjutant BIRD.  The mournful cortege was preceded by the firing party of the militia, with arms reversed, succeeded by the band, under the direction of Mr. VALLANCE, whose instruments were draped in black, playing the “Dead March in Saul”.  Next came the coffin, surmounted with military accouterments, borne by a party of militia and following came his charger, also draped in black.   About twenty of the Yeomanry, in full uniform followed, after whom came the remaining portion of the militia----the officers bringing up the rear.  

At the grave, the  funeral service was conducted by the Rev. Mr. WANNOP, Episcopalian minister, Haddington, of whose church the deceased was a member.   A large number of the townsfolk crowded the streets, and witnessed the imposing spectacle.   Sergeant Sharman leaves a widow, who accompanied him through the Indian campaign, and a young family of five to mourn his loss.


A correction to the above from Richard Sharman:  I found out from a Military Historian in England that my great-great grandfather is buried in Dunbar, not Haddington as I had thought. The reason he gave was that the Episcopal Church in Haddington had not been built till two years after Segt. Sharman died and Dunbar would have been the next closest Episcopal Church. He has a friend in that area who is going to check the cemetery for me.

From the East Lothian (Haddingtonshire) Courier, ca. 1950

THE LATE CAPTAIN FLETCHER OF SALTOUN

"Famous Shorthorn Breeder"

The death took place, on Friday night, of Captain Andrew Mansel Talbot FLETCHER, D.D., J.P., of Saltoun, Pencaitland, the well-known and successful breeder of pedigree Shorthorn cattle.

The eldest son of the late John Fletcher of Saltoun, Capt. Fletcher, who had been in ill health for some months, was born in 1880. Educated at Eton and Magdalene College, Cambridge, he was commissioned in the 2nd Life Guards, serving with them in the South African War. In 1903, when he succeeded his father, he resigned his commission, but on the outbreak of the First World War rejoined the Army and was attached to the Forage Department of the A.S.C. before invalided out of the Service in 1917.

Capt. Fletcher was a racing motorist of some note in the early days of that sport, and was also at one time one of the leading six shots in Scotland.

It was, however, as a breeder of pedigree Shorthorn cattle and as a benefactor to Saltoun and district that Capt. Fletcher was best known. He took up the breeding of Shorthorns many years ago, and this proved so eminently successful that blood from the Saltoun herd is to be found in all parts of the world. Capt. Fletcher scored some signal successes at the annual Perth shows and sales of pedigree cattle of that breed, and only last week, a December bull from the Saltoun herd realised the figure of 1900 guineas. The byres and steading at Saltoun Home Farm were a model of neatness, and farmers from all over the world who visited them were greatly impressed at all they were shown. On the occasions of these visits Capt. Fletcher showed his guests the greatest hospitality at Saltoun Hall, a generosity that was freely commented upon.

Although he took no part in public affairs, Capt. Fletcher had a keen interest in the welfare of the district in which he resided, and was the donor of the Public Hall in the village of East Saltoun which bears his name. One of his most recent acts of generosity was the provision some years ago, of a shooting range attached to the Fletcher Hall for the local Miniature Rifle Club. Entertainments at Saltoun Hall were always a feature of the social life of the district, and each year Capt. and Mrs. Fletcher very generously entertained the children of Saltoun Public School to a visit to the pantomime in Edinburgh.

A former president of the United East Lothian Agricultural Society, Capt. Fletcher took a keen interest in the annual ploughing matches held in recent years by that organisation, and gave several cups for competition in that event. He also took an interesting the annual ploughing matches held in the Pencaitland and Saltoun area.

Capt. Fletcher, who was a Justice of the Peace for East Lothian, married, in 1902, Frances Jane, the elder daughter of the late Sir. F. S. WINNINGTON, 5th Bart, and is survived by his wife, on son (mr. John T. T. Fletcher) and one daughter (The Countess of Mexborough).

Saltoun has been the seat of the Fletcher family since the 17th century, when Sir Andrew Fletcher of Inverpeffer, a judge in the Court of Session, purchased the estate from Lord ABERNETHY. At one time Capt. Fletcher also owned the estate of Margam Castle, Port Talbot, South Wales, and before he disposed of a portion of these lands, frequently resided there. Saltoun Hall, a fine Elizabethan mansion contains the valuable library formed by the famous Andrew Fletcher who died in 1716.

THE FUNERAL

The funeral took place to Saltoun Churchyard, on Wednesday, and was attended by a large and representative gathering of mourners.

Prior to the interment, a service was held at Saltoun Hall, and was conducted by the Rev. R. ECKERSLEY, Haddington, and the Rev. Dr. A. CAMPSIE, Bolton and Saltoun. The choir of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Haddington took part in the service, and the praise included the hymns, "O God Our Help in Ages Past" and "For All the Saints" in addition to the 23rd Psalm.

Following the service, the coffin was borne from the house by estate employees and placed on a farm cart covered with greenery for conveyance to Saltoun Churchyard. Dr. Campsie and Mr. Eckersley officiated at the graveside, and the Holy Trinity Church Choir rendered the hymn, "Abide With Me."

The pall-bearers were: -- Mr. Geo. WATSON (chauffeur). Mr. James BAPTIE (head gamekeeper), Mr. Donald DOW (under gamekeeper), Mr. A. S. ADDISON (head forester), Mr. J. RUSSELL (forester), Mr. J. DINGWALL (Shepherd), Mr. J. MAIN (retired farm manager, Saltoun Home Farm), and Mr. C. TOSH (farms' grieve).

Among those present were: Mrs. Fletcher, Capt.. John Fletcher, London (son); the Countess of Mexborough (daughter) and the Hon. Anthony SAVILLE (grandson), Arden Hall, Yorkshire; Mrs SPEIR (sister), Miss Bertha Speir (niece) and Mr. R. Speir (nephew), North Berwick; Mrs. GRAHAME (sister), Miss Violet Grahame (niece) and Miss Sheila Grahame (niece), North Berwick; the Marquis of Tweeddale (also representing the Lady Clementine WARING) and the Marchioness of Tweeddale; Lt. Col. W. E. PEEL, Eaglescarnie; Lt. Commander A. M. THOMSON, Bolton Muir; Major and Mrs. W. H. CALANDER, Preston Hall; Mr.and Mrs. Hugh DE PREE, Beechhill; Lt. Col. H. B. O'BRIEN, Kilduff; Mr. R. C. SIMPSON, Gullane; Mr. D. S. BURNET, Mr. R. M. LESLIE, Mr. J. RALSTON, Mr. A. KENNEDY, Mr. A. TAIT and Mr. R. SCOTT, Haddington; Mr. and Mrs. F. MACGILLIVRAY, Greenhead; Mr. David SCOTT, Howden; Mr. T. TAIT, Greenlaw; Mr. Wm. J. MCPHERSON, Glenkinchie; Mr. F. DURIE and Mr. F. P. PRENTICE, Saltoun; Mr. J. MAXWELL, Gilchriston; Mr. E. I. REID and Mr. E. I. Reid, Jr., Herdmanston; Mr. David BAILLIE, Seton Dene, Longniddry; and Mr. W. F. MUNRO, factor, Saltoun Estates.

The Earl of Mexborough (son-in-law), Lord POLLINGTON (grandson), Lord WHITBURGH and Major Sholto DOUGLAS were unavoidably prevented from attending the funeral as they are abroad at present.

The many beautiful floral tributes included wreaths from the tenantry of Saltoun Estates, Farms and Estates staff, the indoor staff at Saltoun Hall, Margam Estate office staff, Margam , and Pyle Agricultural Show Committee, Saltoun School children and staff, Saltoun W. R. I. and the Directors of Scottish Malt Distillers, Ltd.

 
Sign on Saltoun Church reads:  
"Deo. O. M. ET. M. Sacrum.  Lord Innerpeffer, Andrew Fletcher Esq., the Patriot.  Lord Milton.  This sprire was erected by Gen. Fletcher Campbell, as a monument to the virtue of his ancestors, and an example for their posterity to imitate.  Salton. 1805.

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Lookup Volunteers, East Lothian

Thanks go to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for volunteering to look up the following names for fellow East Lothian ancestry researchers:  INGLES, PENMAN, & STODDARD

Father This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for his offer to look up HADDEN, HALDEN, HALDANE, HOWDEN and related spellings.   See his page "The Descendants of James HADDEN"

We are also grateful to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.who might assist you in finding records of the HAMILTON surname in East Lothian, as well as M.I.s for the Parish of Pencaitland.

Look-up volunteer is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.who might help you with WALKER, and RICHARDSON surnames with East Lothian origins.

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Counties

County

 

County Host

Aberdeenshire Available for Adoption
Angus (Forfar)

Available for Adoption

Argyllshire

Available for Adoption

Ayrshire Alex Hughes
Banffshire

Available for Adoption

Berwickshire Graeme Hastie
Buteshire Peter Cook
Caithness

Available for Adoption

Clackmannanshire

Available for Adoption

Dunbartonshire Barbara Lewis
Dumfriesshire Graeme Hastie
East Lothian Graeme Hastie
Fife

Available for Adoption

Inverness-shire

Jan Cortez

Kincardineshire

Available for Adoption

Kinross-Shire

Available for Adoption

Kirkcudbrightshire

Available for Adoption

Lanarkshire (Glasgow)

Available for Adoption

Midlothian (Edinburgh)

Available for Adoption

Morayshire

Available for Adoption

Nairnshire

Available for Adoption

Orkney

Available for Adoption

Peeblesshire Graeme Hastie
Perthshire

Available for Adoption

Renfrewshire Nathan Zipfel
Ross-Shire

Available for Adoption

Roxburghshire

Available for Adoption

Selkirkshire

Available for Adoption

Shetland

Available for Adoption

Stirlingshire

Available for Adoption

Sutherland

Available for Adoption

West Lothian

Available for Adoption

Wigtownshire

Available for Adoption